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Corn Refiners Association to FDA: Please let us use a sneaky alias for High Fructose Corn Syrup

On September 14, 2010, the CRA petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to allow manufacturers the option of using corn sugar as an alternative name for high fructose corn syrup. They said this will help clarify the labeling of food products for consumers. Hummmm. Reminds me of a criminal on the lam assuming a new identity. What's next? A fake ID?

I read the Wikipedia article referenced below. Then, I read the fact sheet by the Corn Refiners Association (CRA). The first article is very detailed. The second article appears to be written to naive and trusting kindergarteners.


CRA says high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) "has no artificial or synthetic ingredients."

According to Wikipedia, HFCS is made by:

1. Milling corn to produce corn starch. (OK so far)

2. Treating corn starch with an enzyme called alpha-amylase to produce shorter chains of sugars called oligosaccharides. (We are mimicking a natural process but is it natural in our hands?)

3. Using an enzyme called Glucoamylase, derived from a fungus, to break down the oligosaccharides further to get glucose. (Again, mimicking a natural process)

4. Using an enzyme called glucose isomerase to convert glucose to about 42% fructose, 51% glucose, along with other various sugars. (Again, mimicking a natural process. However, if nature doesn't use these three enzyme processes in this order, how can we call this process natural?)

5. The 42% fructose solution is enriched to 90% using liquid chromatography; a technique used in many chemistry and biology laboratories.

6. The 90% fructose is back-blended with 42% fructose to yield a final product containing either 55% or 45% fructose.

7. Most manufacturers use carbon to remove impurities. (Impurities? I didn't read about impurities in CRA's article. However, if they get the impurities out, are we're supposed to ignore that they were ever there? Is this an industry saying "Trust us?" I think we can trust a big profit oriented company to remove impurities from our diet as far as we can trust a big oil company not to spill oil in the Gulf of Mexico. By the way, someone did test a sample of HFCS and found mercury in it. Oops!)

I know I went into a lot of detail outlining the process of making HFCS but it's important to show that synthetic and artificial is part of the process of making HFCS. Even though the intended product is pure HFCS, the truth is, artificial and synthetic stuff gets in there accidentally because of impurities and the chemicals involved in the process of making it.

The CRA says, "High fructose corn syrup is sugar made from corn." (Yes that's true, but is it reassuring when you know how they make HFCS from corn?)

The CRA says, "High fructose corn syrup or corn sugar contains the same two simple sugars as table sugar (glucose and fructose)." (That's a half truth. Table sugar is glucose and fructose chemically bonded together to form a disaccharide called sucrose. This chemical bond forms a new compound. There is more to sucrose than just fructose and glucose.)

The CRA says, HFCS "is handled the same by the body as table sugar." (This is not true because sucrose contains a glycosidic bond linking fructose and glucose. Our body produces the enzyme, glycoside hydrolase, that converts sucrose in the stomach to the monosaccharides glucose and fructose.)

CRA quotes the American Dietetic Association, “once they (HFCS and sucrose) are absorbed into the bloodstream, the two sweeteners are indistinguishable. (That's true because our body does not absorb sucrose. Our body breaks sucrose down to fructose and glucose before it is absorbed into the bloodstream by the small intestine.)

The last section in the CRA article is titled, "Putting the Consumer First." I know I'm just a living, breathing, walking wallet to them. If I have a wallet, I'm intact, and they can stay in business.

To see a list of health problems associated with HFCS, see Ivan Royster's Facebook page. The link's below.

God bless. Christ is all and in all.

Wikipedia | High-fructose corn syrup

Wikipedia | Sucrose

Corn Refiners Association | Corn Sugar Fact Sheet

Organic Connections | The Impact of One Man’s Outrage

Ivan Royster's Facebook page is a good source for links to information on high fructose corn syrup.

Ivan Royster's Facebook Page | The Ban of High Fructose Corn Syrup in the U.S.

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